WORDS OF WISDOM

Doubting ourselves has killed more dreams than failure ever has. Never doubt your value and pretend to be someone else; someone you're not. Not who you think others want you to be, but who you authentically are, is the most powerful of communication (and marketing.) When you allow yourself to pander to what you feel others may desire, you become imprisoned. Authenticity is true freedom.</p><p>For many years, I hesitated embracing who I am for fear that honesty about my childhood disabilities, obesity and traumatic experiences might injure my reputation. But as John Wooden said, "Your reputation is who people think you are. Your character is who you really are."</p><p>As I withheld who I truly am in the hopes of avoiding injury to my reputation, I diminished my character. When a teacher pointed out this distinction, he reminded me that my only precious currency in life is my integrity. By embracing the totality of my experience in this life, those who have suffered the same and similar circumstances, have become inspired by the story... </p><p>The people who matter and who will benefit from your value are those who will believe in you, not because of what you say, but rather due to your authenticity as it will penetrate to, and resonate with, their inner reason. </p><p>The facade that we wear to impress people only degrades ourselves and distances any value our real message might have to those who dismiss our disingenuous presentation.</p><p>Be you. No, the other one: the REAL you.</p><p>Very respectfully,<br />Scott Sonnon<br />www.facebook.com/ScottSonnon
Doubting ourselves has killed more dreams than failure ever has. Never doubt your value and pretend to be someone else; someone you’re not. Not who you think others want you to be, but who you authentically are, is the most powerful of communication (and marketing.) When you allow yourself to ponder to what you feel others may desire, you become imprisoned. Authenticity is true freedom.For many years, I hesitated embracing who I am for fear that honesty about my childhood disabilities, obesity and traumatic experiences might injure my reputation. But as John Wooden said, “Your reputation is who people think you are. Your character is who you really are.”As I withheld who I truly am in the hopes of avoiding injury to my reputation, I diminished my character. When a teacher pointed out this distinction, he reminded me that my only precious currency in life is my integrity. By embracing the totality of my experience in this life, those who have suffered the same and similar circumstances, have become inspired by the story…The people who matter and who will benefit from your value are those who will believe in you, not because of what you say, but rather due to your authenticity as it will penetrate to, and resonate with, their inner reason.The facade that we wear to impress people only degrades ourselves and distances any value our real message might have to those who dismiss our disingenuous presentation.

Be you. No, the other one: the REAL you.

Scott Shannon
Shared by “Wendy”